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Aviation for Science
Black Carbon pollution research
Mediterranean 2017


  • experienced long distance pilot, biologist, photographer
  • light, eco friendly 300 kg aircraft
  • black carbon detection over Arctic
  • North Pole crossing from Europe to Canada
  • Atlantic crossing via Lindberg route
  • arctic water aerial images

NORTH POLE / APRIL-MAY 2013


and the entire Arctic region have a rich history of discovery and exploration. Legendary expeditions in the name of national interests have lead to discovery of new trade routes, which brought strategic and capital benefits. The Arctic is also very important generator of weather. Changes in the ice shell can have a decisive impact on the speed and direction of ocean currents and thus the lives of the entire world. Today in the early 21st century Arctic expeditions are still frequent, the north polar region has been crossed on foot, on skies, with icebreakers, submarines and aircrafts. But Light and Ultralight planes are still extremely rare in this part of the world. Despite the development of high performance ultralights no one has overflown the North Pole from one continent to another. Furthermore, the research technical instrumentation has been changed as well. Detection devices which weighed hundreds of pounds just a few years ago, nowdays you can fit the same into a fuel efficient, low cost and nature friendly ultralight aircraft. This is also the mission of the GreenLight WorldFlight project which continues in the spring 2013 over the Arctic and North Pole from Europe to Canada and complete the long distance flights by passing the North Atlantic from Newfoundland to Ireland following the Lindberg's record flight New York-Paris. Small ultralight aircraft in the service of science.


THINK SMALL - THINK LIGHT - THINK GREEN


Aerosol scientists such as Ryan Spackman of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Boulder, Colorado, already use much more sensitive instruments mounted on Gulf Stream jets to collect black carbon data—but such flights are expensive for scientists. Small private aircraft could help fill in a lot of data gaps, particularly at low altitudes near urban areas where soot concentrations tend to be high enough for an Aethalometer to provide very good data, Spackman says. “The first few kilometers [above ground level] are the most interesting.”

 

Science 16 March 2012: Vol. 335 no. 6074 p. 1286, DOI: 10.1126/science.335.6074.1284-a
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/335/6074/1284.1.summary?sid=7e849c31-d3ae-4ffd-bbfc-657bf02de5f2
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/335/6074/1284.1.full.pdf



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